HONOURING OH SHINNAH FASTWOLF

Oh Shinnah’s teachers were Native American elders, among the most famous in North America. To name a few that come to mind at this time: Keetowah, Rolling Thunder, and Mad Bear. From her father’s people, she inherited the traditions of the Tineh (Apache); from her mother’s people, those of the Mohawk and Scottish (through her maternal great-grandfather).  Among the Tineh, “Osha” means “Earth”, and “Shinnah” means “to produce the sound, the cry, the heartbeat, the song of the Earth”. Her mission was to speak for the Earth and in the name of the Earth, and to help people who are on their own path of transformation.

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A NICE REVIEW OF MY NEW BOOK MY FIRST ONE IN ENGLISH

Luke Blue Eagle committed to a path of First Nations training in 1979. Studying with Elders in Canada and the United States, he acquired spiritual wisdom that dates back for millennia. Now, he has not only put that teaching into clear terms that will be understandable to modern readers, he has also merged those healing traditions with a very comprehensive treatise on crystals.

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GETTING TOGETHER FOR RITUALS AND CEREMONY IN NATURE

PRÉPARATION À L’OUVERTURE DU VORTEX de LUMIÈRE DU MONDE SPIRITUEL

In all indigenous and natural peoples of the earth there have always been gatherings for cyclical ceremonies and rituals. One of the purposes of these events is the gathering itself. People have an organic need to see each other, to communicate, to laugh together, to dance, to exchange and to share.

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LONG HAIR IN NATIVE AMERICAN TRADITION

Yes this is my hair 🙂

The way people wear their hair is an alignment of their thinking; the braids (unity of thought), the hair tied back (safety of thought) and the color (conviction of thought). The appearance of the hair is of great importance, as each style represents a different state of mind. Hair is widely regarded as an extension of one’s thoughts.

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