MUSHUM – Medecine man of the Innu nation.

MUSHUM
MUSHUM

It’s important for all of humanity to see nature as a friend. There is nothing dangerous in nature. If you dedicate your life to understanding nature she will you give you back a hundredfold and all the beings which populate her will become your friends. This is the original definition of the word “paradise “.

So that you can really understand this, as you are not used to such a concept, I would like to share two short stories. They will also give me the opportunity to write about a friend of mine, a spiritual elder and medicine man of the Innu nation. Marcel Gill Grondin has the honorary name of Mushum, or Grandfather. He has had a very interesting career. He is one of the rare few to have received the traditional education and teachings on healing and spirituality by his forefathers in spite of the genocidal persecution by the Canadian governments and clergy. After a career as behaviorist, rare profession, he now dedicates himself to healing. At 70 years of age he still looks like 50 and works more than 12 hours a day, 7 days a week with a small leave from time to time. He wants to pass on his knowledge so more can continue the gigantic job there is to heal and teach First Nations communities.

All the Innus communities are battling against grave problems, among which some are passed on from generation to generation. This inter-generational effect created by the genocidal use of residential schools has just been proved scientifically by a scientist, a First Nations psychiatrist and researcher. They spoke of this on the radio of Radio Canada on September 29th, 2015 during the program “UNRESERVED”. This very interesting weekly broadcast speaks about First Nations issues. Podcasts are available on-line. But let us come back to our stories …

This past summer Mushum performed the Shaking tent ceremony. In my humble opinion it’s the most impressive of all the ceremonies of the Algonquin nations. The Algonquin linguistic groups of nations are spread over the majority of Canadian territory.

The signs seen were as powerful as the ceremony: lights appeared in the tent, the earth shook, requests made of the ceremony were fulfilled, more was given than was asked for, diseases healed and the traditions revived! The ambiance of love around the ceremony was so great that two grown-up bears, a male and a female, came to rest against the ceremonial tent. Mushum told me, with a spark in his eyes, that they had even been able to pet the female a few moments after the ceremony.

A few weeks later, to relieve the stress coming from the constant healing he does, Mushum went on a hike with his grandson. They bathed in a beautiful small mountain lake, far from all beaten paths. They got some sunshine and made ready a meal. As they were eating a female bear and her 3 cubs came to play by the edge of the lake. The bears were 2 to 3 meters from them at the most. As those who know nature well, both Indians did not interrupt their meal or pay any attention to the bears. At some point a bear cub came to see Mushum’s young grandson. The female bear didn’t react in any way. A few minutes later they left, as nonchalantly as they had come

You see what is perceived as dangerous by technocratic societies is not at all dangerous. Nature is our friend but we do need to get to know and understand her. Such knowledge is more important than all other domains of knowledge, because it is the only one that insures health and perpetuity of generations to come. We shall explain in a coming article how that is possible for all of us, today. In stride with this path of ideas, announcing the publication, in French, of my book “Totem Animals “. This book can enlighten on a very special relationship with animals. Those, who know, will have guessed that bear is Mushum’s totem.

Through the FIRST NATIONS RESEACH FOUNDATION, Mushum receives donations for activities destined for Innu children. His teachings and other activities are also detailed on mushum.com.

All Our Relations

Blue Eagle

MUSHUM - MARCEL GILL GRONDIN
MUSHUM – MARCEL GILL GRONDIN

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